I recently experienced excruciating back pain every day for two weeks. It’s a long story, but suffice to say that this was unusual for me. I had a physical therapy evaluation last week and am now working on stretching some specific muscles that had become over tight. I already feel better!

During the evaluation, the PT asked me to flex and extend my back while standing. Although I regularly bend over (my hamstrings are in good shape!), I have not extended my back while standing upright for at least three years because tipping my head back was my most reliable trigger for vertigo. (In fact, a month ago in a different context, a nurse asked me to extend my neck while sitting upright, and I outright refused to do so.) But last week at PT, I leaned back without hesitation because my gut told me that I would be fine. And I was! It felt like seeing a familiar friend again, and I marveled at the flexibility I still had. The PT put me through a series of measures that had me standing, sitting, lying prone, lying supine, and lying on my sides. I moved through them all with no problem. My gut told me to take extra care moving from a prone position, so I did; otherwise, my movements were basically normal.

So that’s the good news. The bad news is that I couldn’t do even one sit up. Not one! The swinging head motion in sit ups is something that I have avoided for years due to vertigo. I’ve been exercising regularly for the past 15 months, but apparently certain ones of my core muscles still need work. For the first time, I realized the impact vertigo had on my overall body strength. Because I could not move and exercise normally, some of my muscles became weak. I modified exercises as best I could and managed to restart a regular exercise program, but still, problems remain. I’d like to see vestibular physical therapy include creative solutions for these types of muscle problems in patients with ongoing balance problems.

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